HomeNewsEducationKemp signs bill providing needs-based college tuition grants

Kemp signs bill providing needs-based college tuition grants

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by Dave Williams | Apr 29, 2022 | Capitol Beat News Service

ATLANTA – College students needing a financial boost to complete their degrees will get help from the state under legislation Gov. Brian Kemp signed into law Friday.

Under House Bill 1435, students who have earned at least 80% of the credits required for the degree they are seeking will receive a grant of up to $2,500 to help pay their tuition.

The bill passed overwhelmingly on the last day of this year’s legislative session, with only one “no” vote in the state Senate and four in the Georgia House of Representatives.

Kemp thanked House Higher Education Committee Chairman Chuck Martin, R-Alpharetta, for introducing the bill.

“This marks the first needs-based education grant of its kind in Georgia,” the governor said Friday. “Chairman Martin deserves a great deal of credit for making a higher education degree just that much more affordable and attainable here in our state.”

To qualify for a grant, students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application.

The Georgia Student Finance Commission will administer the program, subject to state appropriations.

The bill includes a sunset date of June 30, 2025, to let lawmakers determine whether the program is fulfilling its intended purpose of providing “gap” funding to help financially needy students graduate from college.

Kemp also signed legislation Friday authorizing the Technical College System of Georgia to create new and expand existing apprenticeship programs to train students to work in high-demand fields.

This story is available through a news partnership with Capitol Beat News Service, a project of the Georgia Press Educational Foundation.

3 COMMENTS

  1. I don’t get it! The HOPE scholarship program has several variations for students who are committed to their education. Many students attending college have no idea of the expectations and demands of higher education. Yet, we continue to encourage them to “take a shot” at it. When the realities of challenging work and determination set in, the student must embrace the rigor or step away. Why is this a tax-payer problem? If we are going to dole out all this money for a degree, then why not limit the funds to preparatory degrees from community TECH schools? Planning for a college degree should begin when the student is in high school, not when the student is twenty-years old and totally confused.

    • Amen. I estimate only about 10% of high school graduates are prepared for a rigorous major study program at a university that has not lowered its admission standards and performance standards to keep the revenue stream (tuition), that funds the salaries of tenured professors and coaches, coming in. Any high school grad who wants a good, secure income should look into becoming a welder, plumber, carpenter, HVAC service person, electrician, EV tech, or some other trade that will not be automated in the future.

  2. Fix the HOPE program first. Unless they have changed it, you can go lollygag around for 3 semesters before getting kicked off HOPE. The Universsity system has gotten fat off that. There is a highschool GPA requirement for HOPE qualifying, but we know that is a joke too, depending on the school and how they teach to the lowest common denominator. Make HOPE a loan up front, and if you succeed in college, it is forgiven.

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