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Letter to the editor: Confederate monument can, and should, be moved to a different location

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History and Heritage-matter. Truth matters. But who’s? Certainly not those enslaved – theirs was stolen.

Confederate history is grounded in the words of the states’ secession declarations and the Confederate Constitution. Central to all – that “peculiar institution” – chattel slavery. Georgia’s ...

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12 COMMENTS

  1. You can always just leave Augusta and take your biased attitude against Southerners with you. We love our heritage and our monument that was built way before you were born and nothing you think or say can make it OK to remove our monument.

  2. First off, I am pure Yankee when it comes to my lifelong passion of the Civil War and a baseball team in The Bronx.

    History…good, bad…is history and should never be removed. Period.

    And while you are spitting historical tidbits research how Africans became slaves in the first place or the number of Native Americans who owned slaves or what effect the Potato Famine had on slaves.

    Climb down from your sanctimonious perch and dig into your issue from all sides, it will be enlightening.

  3. The Romans had slaves. Where is the outcry to remove vestiges of barbaric Rome? Tear down the Coliseum! Move the Parthenon to the cemetery!

    The men honored on Broad St. fought to preserve the only honorable way of life they knew. They fought, and died, not to preserve slavery (only the wealthy benefited there), but to defend their homes and loved ones from the onslaught of the Union armies. The vast majority of Confederates just wanted to be left alone, safe and secure in their homeland with no desire to destroy the Republic. They believed that the northern states would recover any losses and prosper in every respect in the future. And, this “peculiar institution” was already destined to dissolve as younger, more enlightened Soytherners

    • Correct. Slavery as an insititution was dying and would have died in short order just as other barbaric practices have over time. Correct too, that only the wealthy held slaves. The majority of southerners were poor farmers.

  4. Many of the older Southerners also understood the evils of human slavery that had been in existence for 5.000 years of recorded history and still exists today in many forms. Jefferson understood, but the entire U.S. economy was based on large scale agriculture with no machinery other than manual labor or mules. Everyone, North (the ships and funding) and South (the land) were tied into the slave (agricultural) economy. Mississippi cotton represented the largest proportion of U.S. exports at the outbreak of the conflict. There was no way the Northern states would allow the Southern states to peacefully secede. Human slavery would probably died out as it did in Brazil in 1887 (without a war).

    However, that lone soldier (a private, I remember) represented soldiers of all eras, called in to service to defend against an invading force, regardless of his government’s “reasons”. His descendants understand this. Efforts to remove or rewrite Southern history are insulting and childish.

    It is hard to respond to a 21st century virtue signalling letter of this type from someone who has probably done little research and not come to the conclusion that everyone was wrapped up in an early nineteenth century economy. and world that is very different from the one we live in. I, for one, am answerable to the Supreme Being, not some 22nd century virtue signalling human.

  5. The idea that slavery was universally supported simply isn’t true. The first 90 years of American history is a story limiting slavery. I see no problem with the monument staying where it is. It should remind people of the failure of a despicable system based on degradation of people and the desperate attempt by the losers to salvage some dignity out of a system were dignity was stripped from the owners of slaves and in many cases the slaves had much more dignity than their owners.

  6. Michael Gallucci, It seems you are spewing Equine Scatology The Georgia Ordinance of Secession, Adopted January 19, 1861 says:
    AN ORDINANCE
    To dissolve the Union between the State of Georgia and other States united with her under a compact of Government entitled “the Constitution of the United States of America.”
    We, the people of the State of Georgia, in Convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained:
    That the ordinance adopted by the people of the State of Georgia in Convention on the second day of January in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and eighty-eight, whereby the Constitution of the United States of America was assented to, ratified and adopted; and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly of this State ratifying and adopting amendments of the said Constitution, are hereby repealed, rescinded and abrogated.
    We do further declare and ordain, That the Union now subsisting between the State of Georgia and other States, under the name of the “United States of America,” is hereby dissolved, and that the State of Georgia is in the full possession and exercise of all those rights of sovereignty which belong and appertain to a free and independent State.
    There is a difference between Yankee and Damn Yankee.

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