HomeNewsEducationState to expand personal finance education for high school students

State to expand personal finance education for high school students

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by Dave Williams | Dec 9, 2021 | Capitol Beat News Service

ATLANTA – Georgia high school students soon will be receiving more instruction in how to handle their personal finances.

The state Board of Education Thursday approved revisions to the high school economics course that significantly expand the personal finances portion of the curriculum.

Students will learn more about managing budgets, building credit, protecting against identity theft and understanding tax forms, student loan applications and pay stubs.

“I strongly believe that education is about preparing students for life,” said State School Superintendent Richard Woods, who proposed the changes.

“This revised course will ensure that every Georgia high school student will learn essential life skills like managing a budget, filing taxes, and using credit responsibly, while also gaining an understanding and appreciation of free market principles.”

The revisions to the economics course were developed by a committee that included content-area teachers and finance industry experts. They were put through 30 days of public comment to get input from teachers, parents and students.

The curriculum changes will take effect during the 2022-23 school year.

This story is available through a news partnership with Capitol Beat News Service, a project of the Georgia Press Educational Foundation.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Finally, a good idea coming from the State BOE. This has been sorely lacking for years. Twenty years ago, when I could walk across the street from my office to Richmond Academy, I participated in a Junior Achievement program that brought personal finance info into the classroom. This is a most important building block that has been missing in our high schools.

  2. Absolutely worth every minute spent in these classes. The poor constitute the vast majority of those victimized by bad financial decisions. (It’s like, well, axiomatic) Knowledge is power and ignorance paves the road to poverty.

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