HomeNewsTwo Georgia highways chosen as corridors for EV charging stations

Two Georgia highways chosen as corridors for EV charging stations

Author

Date

by Dave Williams | Jul 21, 2022 | Capitol Beat News Service

ATLANTA – The Federal Highway Administration has designated two Georgia highways as “alternative fuel corridors” for the purpose of facilitating the construction of electric vehicle charging stations.

U.S. 441 from Cornelia in Northeast Georgia south to Dublin and U.S. 82 from Brunswick west to Albany will add 25%, or approximately 330 miles, to the state’s EV charging network.

“Convenient access to electric vehicle charging stations is critical to innovating and expanding Georgia’s transportation network,” state Commissioner of Transportation Russell McMurry said Thursday.

“These federal designations are important because they signify Georgia’s commitment to alternative fuel options in every part of the state.”

The two highways were selected based on such factors as their location near major job clusters, access to tourism sites, the high share of EV sales in nearby counties, and their proximity to hurricane evacuation routes.

The designations also are expected to enhance Georgia’s chances of landing federal funds from the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure spending bill Congress passed last fall. The legislation earmarked $5 billion in grants to support EV charging stations.

The Georgia Department of Transportation announced last week that it is working with Chicago-based commercial real estate company JLL to plan a network of EV charging stations around the state.

About 30,000 electric vehicles are on Georgia roads today being serviced by more than 1,300 publicly available charging stations with an estimated 3,400 individual outlets.

A legislative study committee created by the General Assembly during this year’s session is expected to begin working soon toward developing a plan for expanding the supply of EV charging stations.

This story is available through a news partnership with Capitol Beat News Service, a project of the Georgia Press Educational Foundation.
 

5 COMMENTS

  1. Proximity to hurricane evacuation routes? That brings up a good question.
    If a hurricane or some other major storm or calamity comes through the area, what good are these charging stations if there is a prolonged power outage? Yes, same can be said for gas stations without power, but you can still get more mileage on a tank of gas than a battery. And there are ways of siphoning gas from one vehicle to another if you’re in a bad pinch.
    Interesting.
    Am I wrong on this?

  2. The first commercial gasoline station opened in Pittsburgh, PA in December 1913 by the Gulf Refining Co., a private sector corporation. Although the federal government subsidizes all sectors of energy production, I can’t find any references that indicate they provided direct subsidies for the construction of gas stations. This is just another move toward communist socialism wherein the government controls industrial and agricultural output, medical care, education, housing, employment, and the media. Capitalism will be dead soon at the hands of the government-corporate Bolsheviks.

    • Your post reminds me of a news-video I saw the other day…and no, it wasn’t on any of our liberal local news channels.
      Seems this store owner…and I didn’t catch if he was a convenience store owner or a gas station owner…was shutting down the Tesla power station stands because Tesla had not paid the man for the electricity used there in months. A customer was there, practically begging the owner to allow him to use one because he was extremely low on power and may not make the next station.
      I’m quite sure there is a lot of info to be considered but I’m not sold on this yet.

Recent posts

Recent comments

Pierce Blitch III on Augusta barber tradition continues
Tedd Antonacci on Bon Air receives failing grade
Catherine McKnight on Bon Air receives failing grade
Carolyn Vickers on Pay going up for city employees
Clarence Powell on Pay going up for city employees
Thomas Yarbrough on Pay going up for city employees
Leza Witherington on Pay going up for city employees
J. Paul Griffin on Pay going up for city employees
Catherine McKnight on Sias found guilty of federal crimes
Dianne Lackey on Dine and Dish: Calvert’s
Jimmy Clark on Faith: Swift retribution
Penny Danner on Faith: Swift retribution
Kevin de l’Aigle on Arrest made in transgender slaying
Barry Paschal on Dine and Dish: Calvert’s
THOMAS SUMNER on Dine and Dish: Calvert’s
Christine Slendak on Gold Cross increase request fails
Thomas Yarbrough on Murder suspect arrested
Thomas Yarbrough on Columbia County inmate dies
Thomas Yarbrough on Operation Grace leads to arrests
Thomas Yarbrough on Operation Grace leads to arrests
Phillip Williams on Operation Grace leads to arrests
Tedd Antonacci on Opinion: Letter to the editor
NancyBlumenthal on “Augusta” By David Sirull
Kelly Wagner on Another homicide in Augusta
Juliann McCraney on Column: Faith: Ups and downs
Robert Schloesser on Saga with Gold Cross EMS continues
Thomas Yarbrough on Garnett Johnson: In his own words
Tedd Antonacci on OPINION: Letter to the editor
Charmain Brackett on Reoccurring Members
Charmain Brackett on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Russell Smeak on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Trudy Edwards on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Gay Wright on Reoccurring Members
Russell Smeak on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Charmain Brackett on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Charmain Brackett on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Russell Smeak on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Thomas Plowden on Short Getaways: Edisto Beach
Charmain Brackett on Man struck by train Thursday
Thomas Yarbrough on Man struck by train Thursday
Tedd Antonacci on Man struck by train Thursday
Dennis Perry on FAITH: Our Only Hope
Nona Zimmerman on Amy Grant at the Miller May 25
Robert Turbyfill on Column: Serene18 – take two
Leonard Zimmerman Jr on In The Kitchen With Vera: Oh Honey
Tedd Antonacci on